Hesston Public Library

Digital Special Collections

Seventh Grade stories (Red cross)
Collection: Documents

Title

Seventh Grade stories (Red cross)

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Subject

Tornadoes--Hesston (Kan.)

Creator

Seventh Grade Class, 1990

Publisher

Hesston Public Library

Date

unknown

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

Books

Identifier

Red Cross and other nice groups.pdf


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Citation
Seventh Grade Class, 1990, “Seventh Grade stories (Red cross),” Hesston Public Library, accessed July 25, 2021, https://hesston.digitalsckls.info/item/472.
Text

Seventh Grade
Tornado History
by Andrew Horst
'
FOREWARD
This book grew out of our experiences with the tornado. The tornado affected many of our students, from minor losses to the devastation of homes.
Writing is a way of processing some of the students’ feelings about this incident which has happened to Hesston. March 13, 1990 will always be etched in the minds of our students.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Matt Bell and Scott Barge................ 1
Adam Buller and Ryan Chupp............... 2
Ben Dreier and Angie Dreier.............. 3
Marie Koehn and Matt Hastings............ 4
Kirsten Blosser and Brian Bretz.......... 5-8
Carol Miller and Luke Peterson........... 9
Kevin Bieker and Roland Boschmann........ 10
Stuart Girk and Nathan Hedrick........... 11
Andrew Horst and Chris Lock.............. 12
Pat Briar and Ed Altum................... 13
Brad Buscher and Darren Cloyd............ 14
Kristi Friesen and Joe Ecker............. 15
Kevin Hoheisal and Monica Hall........... 16
Chris King and Michelle Johnson.......... 17
Sheldon Sharp and Ben Yoder.............. 18
TORNADO!
Travels Southwest to Northeast Usually
0ver Our House
REBUILDING TAKES A LONG TIME
NOTHING Left AFTER wards
ANYTHING CAN BE DESTROYED
DESTRUCTION Is INCREDIBLE
OVERWHELMING
by Matt Bell
Scott BARGE
Kansas's worst tornado was in Udall
Andale tornado in 1917, 12 dead
November 11 tornado in Great Bend 11 dead
Sedgwick and Marion counties May 25, 1917 23 dead
A tornado hit Irving in May 30, 1874 60 dead, 50 injured
Shopping Center destroyed in Emporia

Topeka tornado on June 8, 1966 12 or 13 dead, 600 injured.
On Nov. 11, 1917 tornado hit Great Bend 11 people dead
Residential areas in El Dorado during their tornado 15 dead
Never has there been a tornado bigger than Goessel
Another tornado hit McPherson killed 60 injured 50
Dead 25 in Washington and Brown county tornado
Over 200 people left homeless after Hesston's tornado
Emporia tornado killed 6 and injured 177
Some tornadoes turn around but very few

ADAM BULLER
Ryan Chupp

TRAVEL SOUTHWEST To Northeast, normally
Often CAuse DESTRUCTION
Radio warning
Numerous Amounts of Damage
Awesomely Beautiful
Deadly
Overlooked As "It won't hit us"
Eye of tornado is
Severe weather following
Marie Koehn + Matt Hastings
Fact or Fiction
The average tornado usually travels 30 to 40 mph
Marie Koehn + Matt Hastings
Fact or Fiction
Yes, tornadoes usually do travel
30 to 40 mph. Most of the time
tornadoes travel moderately fast.
They travel north to northeast. Every
once in awhile they might travel
southeast to strait east. The
winds inside the tornado usually
gust 200 to 300 mph. The average
tornado cuts a path of an eighth
of a mile.
Kirsten Blosser
Brian Bretz
The smallest tornado went through Missouri.
False: The greatest killing tornado
went through 3 states Missouri,
Indiana, and Illinoise. It happened
on March 18 1925. 689 people were
killed in the tragic storm.
Fact or Fiction
Tornadoes are classified
on the Fujita-Pearson scale.
Fact. Tornadoes are classified on
the Fujita-Pearson scale. The scale links
maximum wind speed, path length, and path
width. Example: A 0,0,0 tornado would have
maximum wind speeds of lower than 117 km/h
a path length below 1.6 km, and a path
width no greater than 16 m; A 5,5,5 - wind
speeds of 420-512 km/h, path length of 161-
507 km, and a path width of 1.6-5.0 km.
The Fujita scale for Damaging Winds uses
only the first digit of the Fujita-Pearson Scale
(see below)

Original Format

spiral bound book, Xeroxed copy